Presenter Information

Adrianna Hartman

Faculty Sponsor

Rebecca Mirick

Status

Undergraduate

Publication Date

5-1-2021

Department

School of Social Work

Description

Individuals who experienced intrafamilial childhood sexual abuse (ICSA) as a child/adolescent often are impacted as adults by this experience. Many clients of social service agencies may have experienced ICSA as a child or adolescent, but it is unknown how knowledgeable social service agency workers are at recognizing the long-term symptoms and referring these clients for treatment. This research study (N=32) explored the variety of services survivors of ICSA are offered and professionals’ perspectives on the level of effectiveness of these services. All three were deemed helpful by at least 91.30% of participants and referred by at least 52.38%. The goal of this study is to explore the variety of services survivors of ICSA are offered and professionals’ perspectives on the level of effectiveness of these services. This study aimed to answer the questions of what resources are available for individuals with a history of ICSA, what types of interventions do practitioners normally refer these individuals to? The findings from this study and previous research emphasize the importance of education on the topic as well as knowing which resources and interventions are available in the area. Taking these steps would positively impact survivors of ICSA because the individuals who work with this population would be more knowledgeable about the proper interventions, helpful services/resources, and the subject in general.

Presentation Type

Presentation

Included in

Social Work Commons

COinS
 

Lasting Psychological Effects on Survivors of Intrafamilial Child Sexual Abuse and the Available Resources and Interventions in Massachusetts

Individuals who experienced intrafamilial childhood sexual abuse (ICSA) as a child/adolescent often are impacted as adults by this experience. Many clients of social service agencies may have experienced ICSA as a child or adolescent, but it is unknown how knowledgeable social service agency workers are at recognizing the long-term symptoms and referring these clients for treatment. This research study (N=32) explored the variety of services survivors of ICSA are offered and professionals’ perspectives on the level of effectiveness of these services. All three were deemed helpful by at least 91.30% of participants and referred by at least 52.38%. The goal of this study is to explore the variety of services survivors of ICSA are offered and professionals’ perspectives on the level of effectiveness of these services. This study aimed to answer the questions of what resources are available for individuals with a history of ICSA, what types of interventions do practitioners normally refer these individuals to? The findings from this study and previous research emphasize the importance of education on the topic as well as knowing which resources and interventions are available in the area. Taking these steps would positively impact survivors of ICSA because the individuals who work with this population would be more knowledgeable about the proper interventions, helpful services/resources, and the subject in general.