Presenter Information

Victoria Kelsen

Faculty Sponsor

Anthony D'Amico

Status

Undergraduate

Publication Date

May 2020

Department

Sport and Movement Science

Description

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine whether Plyometric training effects dancers’ vertical jump heights and broad jumps, compared to standard jump training activities normally done by dancers.

Methods: The six-week study included 14 collegiate leveled dancers, 9 of them (21.3±2.6 years old) completed the plyometric training program while 5 of them (21.5±2.2 years old) completed the dance training program. Each group met twice a week and participated in pretesting and post-testing. Three tests were used to assess the effects of training and included the squat jump, countermovement jump, and broad jump. The first three weeks of training were a series of beginner jumps (80 touches per session) and then the last three weeks progressed to intermediate leveled jumps (100 touches per session). Data was assessed for normality with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test, and normally distributed data was assessed using the two-tailed T-test. Non-normally distributed data was assessed with a Mann-Whitney U test and the alpha level used was .05.

Results: Improvements in the squat jump were significantly higher in the plyometric group (2.3 inches ± 2.2) compared to the dance group (0.8 inches ± 1.7) (p<.05). Improvements in the broad jump were significantly higher in the plyometric group (10.1inches ± 7.2) compared to the dance group (1.8 inches ± 3.8) (p <.05). No significant differences between groups were found in the countermovement jump (p>.05).

Discussion: According to the findings plyometric training increased dancer's jump heights in both the squat jump and broad jump. This suggests that dancers could incorporate a plyometric training program to improve their jumping ability.

Presentation Type

Poster

COinS
 

The Effect of Plyometric Training on Collegiate Dancer's Jumping Abilities

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine whether Plyometric training effects dancers’ vertical jump heights and broad jumps, compared to standard jump training activities normally done by dancers.

Methods: The six-week study included 14 collegiate leveled dancers, 9 of them (21.3±2.6 years old) completed the plyometric training program while 5 of them (21.5±2.2 years old) completed the dance training program. Each group met twice a week and participated in pretesting and post-testing. Three tests were used to assess the effects of training and included the squat jump, countermovement jump, and broad jump. The first three weeks of training were a series of beginner jumps (80 touches per session) and then the last three weeks progressed to intermediate leveled jumps (100 touches per session). Data was assessed for normality with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test, and normally distributed data was assessed using the two-tailed T-test. Non-normally distributed data was assessed with a Mann-Whitney U test and the alpha level used was .05.

Results: Improvements in the squat jump were significantly higher in the plyometric group (2.3 inches ± 2.2) compared to the dance group (0.8 inches ± 1.7) (p<.05). Improvements in the broad jump were significantly higher in the plyometric group (10.1inches ± 7.2) compared to the dance group (1.8 inches ± 3.8) (p <.05). No significant differences between groups were found in the countermovement jump (p>.05).

Discussion: According to the findings plyometric training increased dancer's jump heights in both the squat jump and broad jump. This suggests that dancers could incorporate a plyometric training program to improve their jumping ability.