Presenter Information

Lindsay Nagle

Faculty Sponsor

David Gow

Status

Undergraduate

Publication Date

May 2020

Department

Psychology

Description

Words in Semitic languages, like Arabic and Hebrew, are created by combining roots and word patterns. In some cases, a word may be composed of a root that repeats a consonant. This consonant repetition is a part of a process called reduplication. Reduplication results in Semitic languages having a morphological root structure, in which some words have a root that repeats the second consonant. The behavioral pilot study I am doing is interested in this reduplication pattern, and if Arabic speakers generalize the root patterns onto words they know, and ones they do not. In a study done by Berent (2002), she had found Hebrew speakers rejected nonwords with unattested repetition patterns, or nonwords with roots that repeated the first consonant, at a faster rate than they rejected nonwords with an attested repetition pattern, or nonwords that had roots that repeated the second consonant. After replicating her experiment with Arabic speakers in a pilot study, we plan to test Arabic speakers in a scanner to assess the representation of reduplication patterns in the brain. Through neural decoding and effective connectivity analyses of brain imaging data, we hope to determine if reduplication is a rule-driven process (grammar) or an associative process involved in mapping speech to stored wordform representations.

Presentation Type

Poster

NagleLindsay-Poster.pptx (18312 kB)
Original PowerPoint slide deck

Included in

Psychology Commons

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The Neural Encoding of Arabic Root Patterns : A Behavioral Pilot Study

Words in Semitic languages, like Arabic and Hebrew, are created by combining roots and word patterns. In some cases, a word may be composed of a root that repeats a consonant. This consonant repetition is a part of a process called reduplication. Reduplication results in Semitic languages having a morphological root structure, in which some words have a root that repeats the second consonant. The behavioral pilot study I am doing is interested in this reduplication pattern, and if Arabic speakers generalize the root patterns onto words they know, and ones they do not. In a study done by Berent (2002), she had found Hebrew speakers rejected nonwords with unattested repetition patterns, or nonwords with roots that repeated the first consonant, at a faster rate than they rejected nonwords with an attested repetition pattern, or nonwords that had roots that repeated the second consonant. After replicating her experiment with Arabic speakers in a pilot study, we plan to test Arabic speakers in a scanner to assess the representation of reduplication patterns in the brain. Through neural decoding and effective connectivity analyses of brain imaging data, we hope to determine if reduplication is a rule-driven process (grammar) or an associative process involved in mapping speech to stored wordform representations.