Presenter Information

Kathleen Arregoces Naze

Loading...

Media is loading
 

Document Type

Presentation

Presentation Date

2021-04-10

Faculty Sponsor

Jean MacLachlan

Description

This presentation will explore how occupational therapy practitioners are addressing the needs of those with chronic pelvic pain. The International Pelvic Pain Society (2019) estimates 25 million women (individuals with female organs) worldwide experience chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and individuals with CPP are more likely to present with functional impairment in household tasks, sleep, and work due to psychosocial barriers and pain (Miller-Matero et al., 2016; Facchin et al., 2015). A qualitative survey consisting of topics related to education, intervention, and population served was electronically distributed to occupational therapy practitioners across the United States. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Implications for this study include increasing awareness and evidence supporting occupational therapy’s role in gender specific health, the need for advocacy within and outside the field of occupational therapy, and increasing continuing education opportunities for addressing pelvic pain. A recent initiative by AOTA Community of Practice for Women’s Health is gathering resources linking occupational therapy and women’s health (Podvey & Lenington, 2019). Results from this study will contribute to the foundation of literature necessary for the emerging practice of women’s/gender specific health to create a relationship between occupational therapy and clients experiencing CPP.

Objectives:• Participants will describe chronic pelvic pain • Participants will describe how chronic pelvic pain may impact occupational performance • Participants will identify the need for occupational therapy practitioners in the emerging area of women’s health

COinS
 
Apr 10th, 12:00 PM

Occupational Therapy and Chronic Pelvic Pain

This presentation will explore how occupational therapy practitioners are addressing the needs of those with chronic pelvic pain. The International Pelvic Pain Society (2019) estimates 25 million women (individuals with female organs) worldwide experience chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and individuals with CPP are more likely to present with functional impairment in household tasks, sleep, and work due to psychosocial barriers and pain (Miller-Matero et al., 2016; Facchin et al., 2015). A qualitative survey consisting of topics related to education, intervention, and population served was electronically distributed to occupational therapy practitioners across the United States. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Implications for this study include increasing awareness and evidence supporting occupational therapy’s role in gender specific health, the need for advocacy within and outside the field of occupational therapy, and increasing continuing education opportunities for addressing pelvic pain. A recent initiative by AOTA Community of Practice for Women’s Health is gathering resources linking occupational therapy and women’s health (Podvey & Lenington, 2019). Results from this study will contribute to the foundation of literature necessary for the emerging practice of women’s/gender specific health to create a relationship between occupational therapy and clients experiencing CPP.

Objectives:• Participants will describe chronic pelvic pain • Participants will describe how chronic pelvic pain may impact occupational performance • Participants will identify the need for occupational therapy practitioners in the emerging area of women’s health