Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)

Department

School of Nursing

First Advisor

Nancy Ebersole

Abstract

Surgical site infections are some of the most common hospital-acquired infections and are associated with higher rates of morbidity and mortality for patients. Surgical site infections can also increase length of hospital stay for patients and elevate healthcare costs. There is extensive literature exploring risk factors associated with acquiring surgical site infections in adults undergoing orthopedic surgery, however, literature exploring this topic in the pediatric population is limited. Additionally, many interventions and assumed risks within the pediatric population are extrapolated from data collected from adults.

A systematic review of the literature was done using the CINAHL database to identify risk factors associated with acquiring surgical site infections in the pediatric orthopedic patient population and interventions to help mitigate these risks. The result of these studies showed that both weight and nutritional status played a role in predicting the incidences of acquiring a surgical site infection. Additionally, prophylactic antibiotic selection and dosing needs to be specific to both the possible pathogen and the patient. A bundle approach to interventions can help to reduce the rate of surgical site infections, however, strict compliance amongst staff can be difficult to ensure. It is imperative as healthcare professionals that we work lo identify associated risk factors for developing surgical site infections within the pediatric population undergoing orthopedic surgery. The identification of these risk factors can guide evidence-based practice to establish interventions that can mitigate these risks and promote health and safety for the pediatric population.

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